About Publications

Publications from the AffiliateMarketIngtools of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes We Treat You (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Released: July 15, 2011
    Due to low health literacy—the degree to which one can understand and make decisions based on health information—many people may have difficulty understanding what coverage they are eligible for under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; making informed choices about what is best for them and their families; and completing the enrollment process. On November 10, 2010, the IOM Roundtable on Health Literacy held a workshop to explore opportunities to advance health literacy in association with the implementation of health care reform.
  • Released: July 13, 2011
    Good health requires good oral health, yet millions of Americans, especially vulnerable and underserved populations, lack access to basic oral health care. The Health Resources and Services Administration and the California HealthCare Foundation asked the IOM and the National Research Council to assess the current oral health care system and make recommendations on ways to improve access to care for vulnerable and underserved populations. The IOM recommends changes to incorporate oral health care into overall health care, changes in education and training of all types of health care professionals, and changes in how oral health care is financed and delivered.
  • Released: July 08, 2011
    Lessons from engineering have the potential to improve both the efficiency and quality of healthcare delivery. The fundamental notion of a high-performing healthcare system—one that increasingly is more effective, more efficient, safer, and higher quality—is rooted in continuous improvement principles that medicine shares with engineering. As part of its Learning Health System series of workshops, the IOM’s Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care hosted a workshop, jointly with the AffiliateMarketIngtools of Engineering, on lessons from systems and operations engineering that could be applied to health care.
  • Released: June 29, 2011
    Chronic pain costs the nation up to $635 billion each year in medical treatment and lost productivity. At the request of HHS, the IOM assessed the state of the science regarding pain research, care, and education. The IOM recommends that HHS develop population-level strategies to increase awareness about pain and its treatments. In addition, the IOM offers a blueprint for action in transforming prevention, care, education, and research, with the goal of providing relief for people with pain in America.
  • Released: June 23, 2011
    Even the youngest children in the United States are at risk of becoming obese. To combat this growing problem and contribute to efforts in obesity prevention in young children, the IOM reviewed factors related to overweight and obesity from birth to age five, with a focus on nutrition, physical activity, and sedentary behavior. The IOM recommends that healthcare providers take opportunities to make parents aware of their child’s excess weight early on. In addition, the IOM recommends that parents and child care providers keep children active throughout the day, provide them with healthy diets, limit screen time, and ensure children get an adequate amount of sleep.
  • Released: June 21, 2011
    Public policy can be one of the most effective approaches to protecting and improving the health of the population. At the request of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the IOM reviewed how statutes and regulations prevent injury and disease, save lives, and improve the health of the population. The IOM recommends that the government update public health statutes to ensure that public health agencies are equipped to combat contemporary challenges. In addition, the IOM recommends that the government and private sector consider health in all policies and evaluate the health effects and costs of major legislation.
  • Released: June 15, 2011
    Whether or not the United States has safe and effective medical countermeasures—such as vaccines, drugs, and diagnostic tools—available for use during a disaster can mean the difference between life and death for many Americans. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the scientific community at large could benefit from improved scientific tools and analytic techniques to undertake the complex scientific evaluation and decision making needed to make essential medical countermeasures available. At the request of FDA, the IOM held a workshop to examine methods to improve the development, evaluation, approval, and regulation of medical countermeasures.
  • Released: June 13, 2011
    The life-threatening nature of cancer and the complexity of cancer treatment options, each with its own set of potential risks and benefits, make it difficult for people with cancer to make decisions about their care. A cancer treatment plan—a written document describing the path of care and who is responsible for each portion of that care—can provide patients with a roadmap to navigate the uncertain path they face. However, most providers lack the tools, time, and resources needed to efficiently and effectively prepare such plans with their patients. The IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum held a workshop to discuss ways to create a more coordinated, patient-centered cancer treatment planning process.
  • Released: June 08, 2011
    Problems with how the neurotransmitter glutamate functions in the brain have been linked to a wide variety of disorders, including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, substance abuse, and traumatic brain injury. Efforts to understand, treat, and prevent glutamate-related disorders can be aided by the identification of valid biomarkers. The IOM’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders held a workshop June 21-22, 2010, to explore ways to accelerate the development, validation, and implementation of such biomarkers.
  • Released: June 07, 2011
    Despite the considerable research on how climate change may affect public health, the impact of climate change on indoor environments has received relatively little attention. At the request of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the IOM examined the current state of scientific understanding of the effects of climate change on those environments. The IOM concludes that climate change can create indoor environmental problems and outlines specific ways for the EPA, other government organizations, and the private sector to prevent or reduce negative health effects from these problems.
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