About Publications

Publications from the AffiliateMarketIngtools of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes We Treat You (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Released: March 23, 2012
    Technologies collectively called omics enable simultaneous measurement of an enormous number of biomolecules; for example, genomics investigates thousands of DNA sequences, and proteomics examines large numbers of proteins. Scientists are using these technologies to develop innovative tests to detect disease and to predict a patient’s likelihood of responding to specific drugs. Following a recent case involving premature use of omics-based tests in cancer clinical trials at Duke University, the NCI requested that the IOM establish a committee to recommend ways to strengthen omics-based test development and evaluation. This report identifies best practices to enhance development, evaluation, and translation of omics-based tests while simultaneously reinforcing steps to ensure that these tests are appropriately assessed for scientific validity before they are used to guide patient treatment in clinical trials.
  • Released: March 21, 2012
    Disasters can stress health care systems to the breaking point and disrupt delivery of vital medical services. Following its 2009 report, which defined crisis standards of care (CSC), the IOM develops important templates to guide the efforts of professionals and organizations responsible for CSC planning and implementation. The latest report provides a foundation of underlying principles, steps needed to achieve implementation, and the pillars of the emergency response system, each separate and yet together upholding the jurisdictions that have the overarching authority for ensuring that CSC planning and response occurs.
  • Released: March 20, 2012
    As the baby boomers age, the population of Americans over the age of 65 is expected to increase to about 55 million in 0. The increase in the older population will result in a surging demand for the delivery of services and create new challenges for older people, their caregivers, and nutrition and social services professionals who seek to ensure these services’ availability. The IOM held a workshop to highlight topics related to community-based delivery of nutrition services for older adults and to identify nutrition interventions and model programs which support the transition to home care as well as health and independent living in the community.
  • Released: March 20, 2012
    New technologies are improving our ability to provide personalized treatment catered to an individual patient. Based on findings from the sequencing of the human genome, genome-based diagnostic tests have the potential to direct therapeutic interventions, predict risk or onset of disease, or detect residual disease. However, because evidence is lacking to show that these tests lead to an improved outcome, adoption has been limited. On November 15, 2011, the IOM held a workshop to discuss the differences in evidence required for clinical use, regulatory oversight, guideline inclusion, coverage, and reimbursement of genome-based diagnostics with the goal of clarifying a pathway for using these tests in clinical settings.
  • Released: March 15, 2012
    Advances in medical treatment have made it possible for people infected with HIV to live longer, healthier lives. The CDC estimates that 1.2 million people live with HIV in the United States, with approximately 50,000 people newly infected each year. People with HIV require continuous access to quality care and treatment for HIV as well as their other health conditions. The White House Office of National AIDS Policy asked the IOM to identify core indicators related to continuous HIV care and access to supportive services, and to monitor the effect of both the National HIV/AIDS Strategy and Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on improving HIV care.
  • Released: February 29, 2012
    The Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act (BPCA) and the Pediatric Research Equity Act (PREA) were designed to encourage more pediatric studies of drugs used for children. The FDA asked the IOM to review aspects of pediatric studies and changes in product labeling that resulted from BPCA and PREA and their predecessor policies, as well as assess the incentives for pediatric studies of biologics and the extent to which biologics have been studied in children. The IOM committee concludes that these policies have helped provide clinicians who care for children with better information about the efficacy, safety, and appropriate prescribing of drugs. The IOM suggests that more can be done to increase knowledge about drugs used by children and thereby improve the clinical care, health, and well-being of the nation’s children.
  • Released: February 23, 2012
    Nearly 69 percent of U.S. adults and 32 percent of children are either overweight or obese, creating an annual medical cost burden that may reach $147 billion. Researchers and policy makers are eager to identify improved measures of environmental and policy factors that contribute to obesity prevention. The IOM formed the Committee on Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention to review the IOM’s past obesity-related recommendations, identify a set of recommendations for future action, and recommend indicators of progress in implementing these actions. The committee held a workshop in March 2011 about how to improve measurement of progress in obesity prevention.
  • Released: February 16, 2012
    Scientific advances over the last decade now indicate that Alzheimer’s disease is a continuous, progressive cognitive disease, most likely beginning many years before dementia is apparent. To discuss the next steps in validating new diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer’s disease, the IOM Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders hosted a public workshop session at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference.
  • Released: February 14, 2012
    Deductible, co-insurance, out-of-pocket limits. Even to those with a basic understanding of health insurance, terms like these can be difficult to explain and understand. Under the Affordable Care Act of 2010, many more Americans will be eligible for health insurance through state insurance exchanges by 2014. Many of these individuals are among the 90 million American adults who lack basic health literacy. The IOM held a workshop that focused on ways in which health literate communication techniques can improve communication to potential enrollees.
  • Released: January 31, 2012
    The epidemic of chronic illness is steadily moving towards crisis proportions, yet maintaining or enhancing quality of life for individuals living with these illnesses has not been given the attention it deserves. In this report, the IOM makes recommendations to the CDC as well as HHS on the development and support of programs to meet the health and social needs of people living with chronic illnesses.