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Publications from the AffiliateMarketIngtools of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes We Treat You (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Released: September 30, 2013
    The IOM Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine’s Global Environmental Health and Sustainable Development Innovation Collaborative seeks to connect and leverage expertise across a variety of fields related to sustainable development, including economics, energy, environmental medicine, public health, and health communication. Following the 2012 UN Conference on Sustainable Development, the roundtable held a series of webinars to help inform the UN post-2015 development agenda process. The webinars covered lessons learned from the Millennium Development Goals process and offered insights on topics and goals that may be considered for global development frameworks being debated and negotiated.
  • Released: September 27, 2013
    Young adults are at a significant and pivotal time of life. They are moving out of the systems and institutions that supported them as children and adolescents, but adult systems and institutions – such as the adult health care system and the labor market – may not be well suited to support their needs. The IOM and National Research Council held a workshop to highlight research on the development, health, safety, and well-being of young adults.
  • Released: September 25, 2013
    Every day in the United States, children and adolescents are victims of commercial sexual exploitation and sex trafficking. Despite the serious and long-term consequences for victims as well as their families, communities, and society, efforts to prevent, identify, and respond to these crimes are largely under supported, inefficient, uncoordinated, and unevaluated. A new IOM/NRC report offers recommendations concerning strategies for responding to commercial sexual exploitation and sex trafficking of minors in the United States, new legislative approaches, and a research agenda.
  • Released: September 24, 2013
    Clinical research is constantly advancing, although perhaps not fast enough to meet the challenges and seize the opportunities presented. New tools are emerging. While challenges remain, these tools have the potential to accelerate the research process and to allow an approach to clinical research that applies the most appropriate methods given the requirements of the situation. This approach includes the leveraging of the information collected in the process of delivering care to drive processes for new insights and continuous improvement, which is at the heart of a learning health system. An IOM workshop, sponsored by the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, was convened to identify the leading approaches to observational studies, chart the course for the use of this growing utility, and guide and grow their use in the most responsible fashion possible.
  • Released: September 24, 2013
    Despite a robust clinical research enterprise, a gap exists between the evidence needed to support care decisions and the evidence available. Streamlined approaches to clinical research provide options for progress on these challenges. Large simple trials (LSTs), for example, generally have simple randomization, broad eligibility criteria, enough participants to distinguish small to moderate effects, focus on outcomes important to patient care, and use simplified approaches to data collection. Significant opportunities, including the wide-spread adoption of electronic health records, could accelerate the potential for the use of LSTs to efficiently generate practical evidence for medical decision making and product development. To address these opportunities, as well as challenges, the IOM held a workshop to highlight the pros and cons of the design characteristics of LSTs, explored the utility of LSTs on the basis of case studies of past successes, and considered the challenges and opportunities for accelerating the use of LSTs in the context of a U.S. clinical trials enterprise.
  • Released: September 23, 2013
    More than 30 years ago, the IOM and the National Research Council released the report Research Issues in the Assessment of Birth Settings which determined methodologies and research needed to evaluate childbirth settings in the United States. Since the release of the report in 1982, the issues surrounding birth settings have evolved and new research has emerged. In March 2013 the IOM held a workshop to review updates to the 1982 report. Presentations and discussions highlighted research findings that advance understanding of the effects of maternal care services in different birth settings on labor, clinical and other birth procedures, and birth outcomes. The workshop also identified datasets and relevant research literature that may inform a future study.
  • Released: September 16, 2013
    Along with recommending revised pregnancy weight gain guidelines, the 2009 IOM and National Research Council (NRC) report, Weight Gain During Pregnancy: Reexamining the Guidelines, identified evidence that preconception counseling and certain practices, such as charting weight gain during pregnancy, can help women stay within the recommended guidelines. However, many women still do not receive adequate pre- or post-conception advice about weight and pregnancy weight gain. Many women and their health professionals remain unaware of the recommended pregnancy weight guidelines and even those women who are aware of the guidelines may find it difficult to obtain guidance to help them achieve those guidelines. The IOM and NRC held a workshop to present a range of dissemination products, and discuss communication and implementation of recommended guidelines for healthy pregnancy weight gain.
  • Released: September 12, 2013
    Each year, child protective services receive reports of child abuse and neglect involving six million children, with many more unreported cases. The long-term consequences of child abuse and neglect are not relegated to only the victim – they also impact their families, future relationships, and society. It is a complex societal problem that requires a comprehensive response. In 1993, the National Research Council (NRC) issued a report that provided an overview of the research on child abuse and neglect. Twenty years later, the Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families asked the IOM and the NRC to update the 1993 report and provide new research recommendations on this public health challenge.
  • Released: September 12, 2013
    Every day, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) carries out important work that contributes to the safety of the United States and furthers the formation and maintenance of a resilient nation. Created in 2002 from a merger that rapidly incorporated parts of eight cabinet departments and 22 government agencies, DHS has struggled to integrate its numerous components and their unique cultures. While it’s very accomplished at performing its missions, the nature of the DHS work environment is inherently stressful, and employees suffer from numerous organizational and morale challenges. The DHS Office of Health Affairs asked the IOM to review current workforce resilience efforts, identify gaps, and provide recommendations for a 5-year strategy to improve DHSTogether, its current workforce resilience program.
  • Released: September 10, 2013
    The IOM examined the quality of cancer care in the United States and concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to a growing demand for cancer care, increasing complexity of treatment, a shrinking workforce, and rising costs. Changes across the board are urgently needed. All stakeholders – including cancer care teams, patients and their families, researchers, quality metrics developers, and payers, as well as HHS, other federal agencies, and industries – must reevaluate their current roles and responsibilities in cancer care and work together to develop a higher quality care delivery system. Working toward the recommendations outlined in this report, the cancer care community can improve the quality of life and outcomes for people facing a cancer diagnosis.
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