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Publications from the AffiliateMarketIngtools of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes We Treat You (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Released: November 04, 2013
    Cancer is the leading disease-related cause of death in adolescents and young adults (AYAs). Each year, nearly 70,000 AYAs between the ages of 15 and 39 are diagnosed with cancer. Adolescents and young adults face a variety of unique short- and long-term health and psychosocial issues. Many programs for cancer treatment, survivorship care, and psychosocial support do not focus on the specific needs and risks of AYA cancer patients. The IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum held a workshop to facilitate discussion about gaps and challenges in caring for AYA cancer patients and potential strategies and actions to improve the quality of their care.
  • Released: October 30, 2013
    Despite growing awareness of sports-related concussions and campaigns to educate athletes, coaches, physicians, and parents of young athletes about concussion recognition and management, confusion and controversy persist in many areas. The IOM and the National Research Council formed an expert committee to review the science of sports-related concussions in youth from elementary school through young adulthood, as well as in military personnel and their dependents. The report finds that while some studies provide useful information, much remains unknown about the extent of concussions in youth; how to diagnose, manage, and prevent concussions; and the short- and long-term consequences of concussions as well as repetitive head impacts that do not result in concussion symptoms.
  • Released: October 22, 2013
    At least 11 million adults with disabilities, limitations, and functional impairments in the United States receive long-term services and supports – such as assistance with eating, bathing, and dressing – in order to live independently. The financing of long-term services and supports has become a major issue in the United States. With the projected aging of the U.S. population, the number of individuals needing long-term services and supports is expected to increase substantially. Given the magnitude of the challenged posed by the financing of long-term services and supports, the IOM and National Research Council held a workshop in an effort to foster dialogue and confront issues of mutual interest and concern.
  • Released: October 18, 2013
    Data suggests that one in 10 older adults in the United States experience physical, psychological, and sexual abuse, neglect, or financial exploitation. Elder abuse violates older adults’ fundamental rights to be safe and free from violence. With the global population of adults older than 60 expected to double to 1.2 billion by 5, the number of older adults will exceed the number of children for the first time in history. Despite the growing magnitude of elder abuse, it has been an underappreciated public health problem. The IOM Forum on Global Violence Prevention held a workshop on elder abuse and its prevention to shed light on this underappreciated and often overlooked form of violence.
  • Released: October 15, 2013
    Evidence shows that violence is not inevitable, but rather can be prevented through approaches that have demonstrated measureable effects in the reduction of violence. Successful and promising violence prevention programs exist that target different types of violence, including self-directed, interpersonal, and collective violence; however, the existing evidence base does not necessarily inform practice or policy making. Furthermore, gaps in the evidence base exist, particularly in the context of interventions in low- and middle-income countries. The IOM Forum on Global Violence Prevention held a workshop to explore the value and application of the evidence for violence prevention across the lifespan and around the world.
  • Released: October 15, 2013
    Health literacy is the product of the interaction between individuals’ capacities and the health literacy-related demands and complexities of the health care system. Systematic changes are needed to better align health care demands with the public’s skills and abilities. In early 2012, members of the IOM Roundtable on Health Literacy published a discussion paper that focused on the attributes of a health literate health care organization or system. To examine what is known about implementation of the attributes of a health literate health care organization, the Roundtable on Health Literacy held a workshop on April 11, 2013.
  • Released: October 07, 2013
    In a time of rapidly changing environments and evolving technologies, health professionals and those who train them are being challenged to work beyond their traditional comfort zones and often in teams. A new professionalism might be a mechanism for achieving improved outcomes by applying a “transdisciplinary professionalism” throughout health care and wellness that emphasizes cross-disciplinary responsibilities and accountabilities. The IOM held a workshop to discuss how a shared understanding can be integrated into education and practice to promote a transdisciplinary model of professionalism. Participants in the workshop also explored the barriers to transdisciplinary professionalism as well as the impact of an evolving professional context on health system users, learners, and others within the health system.
  • Released: October 07, 2013
    Several provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) offer an unprecedented opportunity to shift the focus of health experts, policy makers, and the public beyond health care delivery to the broader array of factors that play a role in shaping health outcomes. The shift includes a growing recognition that the health care delivery system is responsible for only a modest proportion of what makes and keeps Americans healthy. The IOM Roundtable on Population Health Improvement held a workshop to explore the likely impact on population health improvement of various provisions within the ACA.
  • Released: October 03, 2013
    Neurodegenerative diseases – such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) – are becoming increasingly more prevalent in the United States due to the aging population. Implications of these diseases are grave, both for individual and family quality of life and for healthcare costs. Recent findings have revealed potential commonalities and parallelisms in genetic and cellular mechanisms across neurodegenerative diseases. In 2012, the IOM hosted a workshop to explore commonalities across neurodegenerative diseases and to identify potential opportunities for collaboration across the respective research and development communities.
  • Released: September 30, 2013
    In 2012, the IOM released Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Framework (Phase I: Demonstration of Concept and a Software Blueprint) which offered a framework and proof of concept for a software prototype called SMART Vaccines to account for various factors influencing vaccine prioritization — demographic, economic, health, scientific, business, programmatic, social, policy factors and public concerns. In this report, Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Software Tool (Phase II: Prototype of a Decision-Support System) a functional version of SMART Vaccines 1.0 is discussed and elaborated along with its potential application in making decisions about new vaccine development.
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