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Publications from the AffiliateMarketIngtools of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes We Treat You (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Released: November 18, 2010
    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for ensuring that medical devices are safe and effective before they go on the market. As part of its assessment of the FDA’s premarket clearance process for medical devices, the IOM held a workshop on July 28 to discuss how medical devices are monitored for safety after they are available to consumers. This document summarizes the workshop.
  • Released: October 29, 2010
    It is as yet uncertain how the Gulf of Mexico oil spill will affect the health of clean-up workers, residents, and visitors in the Gulf. The IOM recommends that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services focus on researching psychological and behavioral health, exposure to oil and dispersants, seafood safety, communication methods for health studies, and methods for conducting research in order to better understand and mitigate the effects on human health for this oil spill and for future disasters.
  • Released: October 29, 2010
    The 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign was one of the largest public health campaigns in U.S. history, vaccinating one-quarter of the population in the first three months. The IOM held three workshops in Raleigh, NC; Austin, TX; and Seattle, WA to learn from participants’ experiences during the campaign and improve future emergency vaccination programs.
  • Released: October 22, 2010
    During public health emergencies such as terrorist attacks or influenza outbreaks, the public health system’s ability to save lives could depend on dispensing medical countermeasures such as antibiotics, antiviral medications, and vaccines to a large number of people in a short amount of time. The IOM’s Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events held a workshop on November 18, 2009, to provide an overview of current threats, recent progress made in the public health system for distributing and dispensing countermeasures, and remaining vulnerabilities.
  • Released: October 14, 2010
    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for ensuring that medical devices are safe and effective before they go on the market. As part of its assessment of the FDA’s premarket clearance process for medical devices, the IOM held a workshop June 14-15 to discuss how to best balance patient safety and technological innovation. This document summarizes the workshop.
  • Released: October 08, 2010
    The Gulf of Mexico oil spill is unprecedented in its size and duration, as were the use of chemical dispersants and controlled burns to remove the oil. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is developing a study protocol to investigate the health effects on clean-up workers. The IOM held a workshop to review and comment on NIEHS’s study protocol.
  • Released: October 07, 2010
    In 2003, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) introduced the BioWatch program—a federal monitoring system intended to speed detection of specific biological agents that could be released in aerosolized form during a biological attack. A report by the IOM and the National Research Council evaluates the costs and merits of the BioWatch program, examines infectious disease surveillance through U.S. hospitals and public health agencies, and considers whether BioWatch and traditional infectious disease surveillance are redundant or complementary.
  • Released: September 16, 2010
    More than two hundred thousand people in the United States living with HIV/AIDS do not know they are infected. The IOM’s Committee on HIV Screening and Access to Care held a workshop and reviewed literature to explore barriers and facilitators to more widespread HIV testing. This report contains the committee’s conclusions.
  • Released: September 08, 2010
    Newborn screening samples are used to test more than 4 million infants each year for life-threatening diseases that are treatable if found at birth. These specimens also represent a potentially invaluable resource for public health and biomedical research. The IOM held a workshop to examine issues surrounding the use of blood samples for translational research.
  • Released: September 07, 2010
    Years of using, misusing, and overusing antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs has led to the emergence of multidrug-resistant “superbugs.” The IOM’s Forum on Microbial Threats held a public workshop April 6-7 to discuss the nature and sources of drug-resistant pathogens, the implications for global health, and the strategies to lessen the current and future impact of these superbugs.
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