About Publications

Publications from the AffiliateMarketIngtools of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes We Treat You (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Released: May 10, 2012
    Ranking Vaccines: A Prioritization Framework describes a decision-support model and the blueprint of a software called Strategic Multi-Attribute Ranking Tool for Vaccines, or SMART Vaccines, that should help decision makers prioritize new vaccines by accounting for demographic, economic, health, scientific, business, programmatic, social, policy and related factors.
  • Released: May 08, 2012
    Two-thirds of adults and one-third of children are overweight or obese. Left unchecked, obesity’s effects on health, health care costs, and our productivity as a nation could become catastrophic. The staggering human toll of obesity-related chronic disease and disability and an annual cost of $190.2 billion for treating obesity-related illness underscore the urgent need to strengthen obesity prevention efforts in the United States. The IOM evaluated prior obesity-prevention strategies and identified recommendations to accelerate progress. The IOM’s recommendations, when implemented together, could profoundly reshape the environments where people live, learn, work, and play.
  • Released: April 10, 2012
    The poor performance of the United States in life expectancy and other major health outcomes, as compared with its global peers reflects what the nation prioritizes in its health investments. The health system’s failure to develop and deliver effective preventive strategies continues to take a growing toll on the economy and society. In this report, the IOM assesses both the sources and adequacy of current government public health funding and identifies approaches to building a sustainable and sufficient public health presence going forward.
  • Released: April 09, 2012
    Every job can lead to stress for a variety of reasons. How a person responds to stress in the workplace can be determined by the workplace environment. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has raised concerns that long-term exposures to stressors may reduce individual resilience and negatively affect employee’s physical and mental well-being. To explore DHS workforce resiliency, the IOM hosted two workshops in 2011 focused on DHS’s operational and law enforcement personnel and its policy and program personnel with top secret security clearances.
  • Released: April 02, 2012
    A 2010 IOM report, Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World, found that not only is it possible to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease and related chronic diseases in developing countries, but also that such a reduction will be critical to achieving global health and development goals. As part a series of follow-up activities to the 2010 report, the IOM held a workshop that aimed to identify what is needed to create tools for country-led planning of effective, efficient, and equitable provision of chronic disease control programs.
  • Released: March 30, 2012
    Although epilepsy is one of the nation’s most common neurological disorders, public understanding of it is limited. Living with epilepsy is about much more than just seizures; the disorder is often defined in practical terms, such as challenges in school, uncertainties about social situations and employment, limitations on driving, and questions about independent living. The IOM examines the public health dimensions of the epilepsies, focusing on public health surveillance and data collection; population and public health research; health policy, health care, and human services; and education for people with the disorder and their families, health care providers, and the public.
  • Released: March 28, 2012
    Primary care and public health historically have operated independently of one another, though each share the common goal of promoting the health and well-being of all people. New opportunities are emerging that could bring the two sectors together in ways that will yield substantial and lasting improvements in the health of individuals, communities, and populations. The IOM examined the integration of primary care and public health and identifies a set of core principles that can serve as a roadmap to move the nation toward a more efficient health system.
  • Released: March 21, 2012
    Disasters can stress health care systems to the breaking point and disrupt delivery of vital medical services. Following its 2009 report, which defined crisis standards of care (CSC), the IOM develops important templates to guide the efforts of professionals and organizations responsible for CSC planning and implementation. The latest report provides a foundation of underlying principles, steps needed to achieve implementation, and the pillars of the emergency response system, each separate and yet together upholding the jurisdictions that have the overarching authority for ensuring that CSC planning and response occurs.
  • Released: March 20, 2012
    New technologies are improving our ability to provide personalized treatment catered to an individual patient. Based on findings from the sequencing of the human genome, genome-based diagnostic tests have the potential to direct therapeutic interventions, predict risk or onset of disease, or detect residual disease. However, because evidence is lacking to show that these tests lead to an improved outcome, adoption has been limited. On November 15, 2011, the IOM held a workshop to discuss the differences in evidence required for clinical use, regulatory oversight, guideline inclusion, coverage, and reimbursement of genome-based diagnostics with the goal of clarifying a pathway for using these tests in clinical settings.
  • Released: March 15, 2012
    Advances in medical treatment have made it possible for people infected with HIV to live longer, healthier lives. The CDC estimates that 1.2 million people live with HIV in the United States, with approximately 50,000 people newly infected each year. People with HIV require continuous access to quality care and treatment for HIV as well as their other health conditions. The White House Office of National AIDS Policy asked the IOM to identify core indicators related to continuous HIV care and access to supportive services, and to monitor the effect of both the National HIV/AIDS Strategy and Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on improving HIV care.
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