About Publications

Publications from the AffiliateMarketIngtools of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes We Treat You (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Released: October 05, 2012
    Approximately 1.2 million people in the United States live with HIV, and the number increases each year. This second of two IOM reports on monitoring HIV care shows that monitoring will provide an enhanced means of assessing the effect of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy and the Affordable Care Act on care received by people with HIV – knowledge that can inform future planning and guide potential redistribution of resources to improve the efficiency and quality of care and reduce health disparities.
  • Released: September 28, 2012
    Digital health data are the lifeblood of a continuous learning health system. A steady flow of reliable data is necessary to coordinate and monitor patient care, analyze and improve systems of care, conduct research to develop new products and approaches, assess the effectiveness of medical interventions, and advance population health. The totality of available health data is a crucial resource that should be considered an invaluable public asset in the pursuit of better care, improved health, and lower health care costs. This publication summarizes discussions at the March 2012 IOM workshop to identify and characterize the current deficiencies in the reliability, availability, and usability of digital health data and consider strategies, priorities, and responsibilities to address such deficiencies.
  • Released: September 27, 2012
    Physical fitness affects our ability to function and be active. At poor levels, it is associated with such health outcomes as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Physical fitness testing in American youth was established on a large scale in the 1950s with an early focus on performance-related fitness that gradually gave way to an emphasis on health-related fitness. In this report, the IOM assesses the relationship between youth fitness test items and health outcomes, recommends the best fitness test items, provides guidance for interpreting fitness scores, and provides an agenda for needed research.
  • Released: September 10, 2012
    Globalization of the food supply has created conditions favorable for the emergence, reemergence, and spread of food-borne pathogens—compounding the challenge of anticipating, detecting, and effectively responding to food-borne threats to health. In the United States, food-borne agents affect 1 out of 6 individuals and cause approximately 48 million illnesses, 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths each year. A One Health approach to food safety may hold the promise of harnessing and integrating the expertise and resources from across the spectrum of multiple health domains including the human and veterinary medical and plant pathology communities with those of the wildlife and aquatic health and ecology communities. The IOM’s Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a public workshop on December 13 and 14, 2011 that examined issues critical to the protection of the nation’s food supply.
  • Released: September 05, 2012
    Genomic information has significantly increased our understanding of disease and the integration of genome-based strategies into drug discovery and development processes has resulted in the recent successful development of a number of new targeted therapeutics. However, there remains skepticism over how useful genomic information will be to the larger drug development process, requiring examination of the impact of and challenges for incorporating genome-based strategies. On March 21, 2012, the IOM held a workshop to examine the general approaches being used to apply genome-based research results to the discovery and development of new drugs, the successes achieved so far, and the challenges ahead.
  • Released: July 31, 2012
    As part of the critical infrastructure of any community, health systems and assets are vital not only for the safety and well-being of its citizens, but also for the economic vitality, quality of life, and livelihood of the entire community. The IOM Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events sponsored a town hall session at the 2012 Public Health Preparedness Summit, held February 21-24 in Anaheim, CA. The session focused on sustaining health care delivery beyond the initial response to a disaster and facilitating the full long-term recovery of the local health care delivery systems.
  • Released: July 18, 2012
    Approximately 80 million adults in the United States have low health literacy – an individual’s ability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information – creating a plethora of health-related difficulties. It is important for health care organizations to develop strategies that can improve their health literacy, yet organizations often find it difficult to determine exactly what it means to be health literate. The IOM Roundtable on Health Literacy held a workshop to discuss the growing recognition that health literacy depends not only on individual skills and abilities but also on the demands and complexities of the health care system.
  • Released: May 29, 2012
    Animals are widely used in neuroscience research to explore biological mechanisms of nervous system function, to identify the genetic basis of disease states, and to provide models of human disorders and diseases for the development of new treatments. To ensure the humane care and use of animals, numerous laws, policies, and regulations are in place governing the use of animals in research, and certain animal regulations have implications specific to neuroscience research. To consider animal research regulations from a global perspective, the IOM held a workshop that brought together key stakeholders to discuss current and emerging trends in animal regulations as they apply to the neurosciences.
  • Released: May 17, 2012
    Influenza pandemics overwhelm health care systems with thousands or hundreds of thousands of sick patients, as well as those worried they may be sick. In order to ensure a successful response to the patient swell caused by a pandemic, robust planning is essential. Distribution and dispensing of antiviral medications will need to occur within a potentially limited timeframe, and persist over a period of time to treat multiple waves of the pandemic. In response to a request from the CDC, the IOM held a series of workshops that explored the public’s perception of potential alternative strategies for facilitating access to antiviral medications and treatment during an influenza pandemic.
  • Released: May 11, 2012
    Many organizations are making focused efforts to prevent obesity. To achieve their goals, accelerate their progress, and sustain their success, the assistance of many other individuals and groups—not all of them with a singular focus on obesity prevention—will be essential. In October 2011 the Institute of Medicine held a workshop that provided an opportunity for obesity prevention groups to hear from and hold discussions with many of these potential allies in obesity prevention. They explored common ground for joint activities and mutual successes, and lessons learned from efforts at aligning diverse groups with goals in common.
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