About Publications

Publications from the AffiliateMarketIngtools of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes We Treat You (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Released: September 03, 2014
    The Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a public workshop on September 24 and 25, 2013, to explore the scientific and policy dimensions of the impacts of global environmental change on infectious disease dynamics. Participants examined and discussed the observed and likely influences of environmental factors, acting both individually and synergistically on infectious disease dynamics. A range of approaches to improve global readiness and capacity for surveillance, detection, and response to emerging microbial threats to plant, animal, and human health in the face of ongoing global environmental change was also discussed.
  • Released: July 28, 2014
    The Roundtable on Population Health Improvement held a public workshop on February 6, 2014 to explore the range of resources that might be available to provide a secure funding stream for non-clinical actions to enhance health. The workshop featured a number of presentations and discussions, beginning with an overview of the range of potential resources (for example, financial, human, and community) and followed by an in-depth exploration of several dimensions related to financial resources. This document summarizes the workshop.
  • Released: July 22, 2014
    Clinical use of DNA sequencing relies on identifying linkages between diseases and genetic variants or groups of variants. More than 140,000 germline mutations have been submitted to the Human Gene Mutation Database and almost 12,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms have currently been associated with various diseases, including Alzheimer’s and type 2 diabetes, but the majority of associations have not been rigorously confirmed and may play only a minor role in disease. Because of the lack of evidence available for assessing variants, evaluation bodies have made few recommendations for the use of genetic tests in health care.
  • Released: July 22, 2014
    Clinical use of DNA sequencing relies on identifying linkages between diseases and genetic variants or groups of variants. More than 140,000 germline mutations have been submitted to the Human Gene Mutation Database and almost 12,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms have currently been associated with various diseases, including Alzheimer’s and type 2 diabetes, but the majority of associations have not been rigorously confirmed and may play only a minor role in disease. Because of the lack of evidence available for assessing variants, evaluation bodies have made few recommendations for the use of genetic tests in health care.
  • Released: July 14, 2014
    Recognizing the limitations of most SSA countries to effectively treat MNS disorders, the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders of the Institute of Medicine convened a workshop in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in January 2014. The workshop brought together key stakeholders to discuss opportunities for achieving long-term affordable access to medicines for MNS disorders and to consider frameworks and strategies that have been successful in other countries and for different diseases. In particular, the workshop was organized around a series of focused discussions on four challenge areas: insufficient demand, inappropriate selection, ineffective supply chains, and high pricing and poor financing. This document summarizes the workshop.
  • Released: June 26, 2014
    On January 7–8, 2014, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) held a workshop to explore examples of recent evaluation experiences that have drawn on an array of available methodologies applied in different ways to evaluate health and development initiatives. The workshop was an opportunity to reflect on the relative benefits and limitations of different evaluation design options that can be used within the context of a large-scale, complex initiative to reach credible conclusions and recommendations and to improve the implementation and performance of the evaluated initiative. This document summarizes the workshop.
  • Released: June 18, 2014
    On December 5, 2013, the IOM Roundtable on Population Health Improvement and the Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities co-sponsored a workshop to explore the history of social movements, both those that are health-related and those that are not primarily focused on health. The objective was to learn and discuss lessons that may be applied by those who are working to improve health and health equity in U.S. communities. This document summarizes the workshop.
  • Released: June 18, 2014
    On December 5, 2013, the IOM Roundtable on Population Health Improvement and the Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities co-sponsored a workshop to explore the history of social movements, both those that are health-related and those that are not primarily focused on health. The objective was to learn and discuss lessons that may be applied by those who are working to improve health and health equity in U.S. communities. This document summarizes the workshop.
  • Released: June 13, 2014
    Many of the elements of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) went into effect in 2014, and with the establishment of many new rules and regulations, there will continue to be significant changes to the U.S. health care system. It is unclear what impact these changes will have on medical and public health preparedness programs around the country. The implementation of the ACA provides an opportunity to consider how to better incorporate preparedness into all aspects of the evolving health care system and daily delivery of care. The IOM held a workshop to discuss how changes to the health system as a result of the ACA might impact medical and public health preparedness programs across the nation.
  • Released: June 12, 2014
    For the first time in decades, promising news has emerged regarding efforts to curb the obesity crisis in the United States. For example, obesity rates have fallen among low-income children in several states, the prevalence of obesity has plateaued among girls, and targeted efforts in some states have reduced the prevalence of obesity among children. Yet major problems remain. Diseases associated with obesity continue to incur substantial costs and cause widespread human suffering. In 2013 the IOM formed the Roundtable on Obesity Solutions to engage leadership from multiple sectors in addressing the obesity crisis. In January 2014, the roundtable held its first public workshop which featured presentations that described interventions designed to prevent and treat obesity in different settings.
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