About Publications

Publications from the AffiliateMarketIngtools of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes We Treat You (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Released: November 12, 2010
    In 2009, the U.S. Department of Agriculture received $15 million to conduct research related to its Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, more commonly known as WIC. The IOM’s Food and Nutrition Board held a public workshop on July 20-21, 2010, to discuss priorities and needs for research on the short- and long-term health effects of the program.
  • Released: November 04, 2010
    The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) supports the nutrition and health of more than 3 million infants and children and more than 114,000 impaired or older adults. At the request of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the IOM examined meal requirements for CACFP and recommends updates, consistent with current dietary guidance that promotes consuming more healthful, nutritious foods.
  • Released: November 03, 2010
    Does a longer life mean a healthier life? The number of adults over 65 in the United States is growing, but many may not be aware that they are at greater risk from foodborne diseases and their nutritional needs change as they age. The IOM’s Food Forum held a workshop October 29-30, 2009, to discuss food safety and nutrition concerns for older adults and the future challenges to providing healthy and safe foods to aging populations.
  • Released: October 13, 2010
    In recent years, food manufacturers have begun to include “front-of-package” (FOP) labeling on their food packaging to convey nutrition messages to consumers. In considering how FOP labeling should be used as a nutrition education tool in the future, the IOM concludes that it would be useful if FOP labeling declare calories, serving size, saturated fats, trans fats, and sodium, as this information is most closely related to obesity and prominent health conditions.
  • Released: June 08, 2010
    Foodborne illnesses cause hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations and thousands of deaths in the United States each year. At the request of Congress, the IOM examined gaps in the current food safety system under the purview of the Food and Drug Administration.
  • Released: April 23, 2010
    About 68 percent of U.S. adults aged 20 years or older and nearly 32 percent of U.S. children are overweight or obese. The obesity epidemic poses major challenges for policy makers, public health professionals, and other decision makers who need to act decisively to respond to this widespread health problem. This report presents the IOM’s innovative framework process to guide the use of evidence in decision making about obesity prevention policies and programs and to guide the generation of new and relevant evidence.
  • Released: April 20, 2010
    Population-wide reductions in sodium intake could prevent more than 100,000 deaths annually. In 2008, Congress asked the IOM to recommend strategies for reducing sodium intake to levels recommended in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. In this report, the IOM concludes that reducing sodium content in food requires new government standards for the acceptable level of sodium.
  • Released: March 25, 2010
    Both the United Kingdom and United States are grappling with nationwide epidemics of obesity. The IOM brought together policy makers from the U.K. and U.S. for a workshop on October 22, 2009, to discuss the challenges of and promising approaches to the struggle against obesity.
  • Released: March 22, 2010
    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for nearly 30 percent of deaths in low and middle income countries each year, yet most governments, global health institutions, and development agencies have largely overlooked it. The IOM recommends strategies to reduce the global burden of CVD.
  • Released: February 22, 2010
    Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, is one of the nation’s leading causes of death. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention asked the IOM to identify high-priority areas on which public health organizations and professionals should focus in order to accelerate progress in hypertension reduction and control. This report contains the IOM’s recommendations.
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