About Publications

Publications from the AffiliateMarketIngtools of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide objective and straightforward advice to decision makers and the public. This site includes We Treat You (HMD) publications released after 1998. A complete list of HMD’s publications from its establishment in 1970 to the present is available as a PDF.


  • Released: June 08, 2011
    Problems with how the neurotransmitter glutamate functions in the brain have been linked to a wide variety of disorders, including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, substance abuse, and traumatic brain injury. Efforts to understand, treat, and prevent glutamate-related disorders can be aided by the identification of valid biomarkers. The IOM’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders held a workshop June 21-22, 2010, to explore ways to accelerate the development, validation, and implementation of such biomarkers.
  • Released: June 01, 2011
    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) afflict more than 1.4 billion people, many of whom live on less than $1.25 a day. While there are effective ways to manage NTDs, policy-makers and funders have only recently begun to recognize the economic and public health importance of controlling NTDs. The IOM’s Forum on Microbial Threats held a workshop September 21-22, 2010, to discuss the science of and policy surrounding NTDs.
  • Released: April 20, 2011
    A single tick bite can have debilitating consequences. Lyme disease is the most common disease carried by ticks in the United States, and the number of those afflicted is growing steadily. If left untreated, the diseases carried by ticks—known as tick-borne diseases—can cause severe pain, fatigue, neurological problems, and other serious health problems. The IOM held a workshop October 11-12, 2010, to examine the state of the science in Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases.
  • Released: February 28, 2011
    Technological advances are altering the way cancer research is conducted and cancer care is delivered, and research increasingly is an international effort. At the same time, research budgets are shrinking and the cost of care is growing. The National Cancer Policy Summit brought together leaders in the cancer community to discuss these changes in research and care. Participants suggested many potential actions to provide more patient-centered cancer care, foster more collaboration, and achieve other goals to improve research and care.
  • Released: February 25, 2011
    One way scientists are working to overcome challenges in cancer treatment and improve cancer care is through nanotechnology. The National Cancer Policy Forum held a workshop July 12-13, 2010, to explore challenges in the use of nanotechnology in oncology.
  • Released: January 27, 2011
    In 2009, the H1N1 influenza pandemic brought to the forefront the many unknowns about the virulence, spread, and nature of the virus, as well as questions regarding personal protective equipment (PPE) for healthcare personnel. In this report, the IOM assesses the progress of PPE research and identifies future directions for PPE for healthcare personnel.
  • Released: December 10, 2010
    Biological differences between the sexes influence not only individual health but also public health, biomedical research, and health care. The IOM held a workshop March 8-9, 2010, to discuss sex differences and their implications for translational neuroscience research, which bridges the gap between scientific discovery and application.
  • Released: December 10, 2010
    Nearly 5.3 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, and 26.6 million people are affected worldwide. The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a public-private partnership, provides a publicly available, international database of clinical and imaging data to foster research and collaboration on Alzheimer’s research worldwide. The IOM held a workshop on July 12, 2010, to explore opportunities to use information from and partnerships formed because of ADNI to continue to improve the understanding and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Released: November 29, 2010
    HIV/AIDS is a catastrophe globally but nowhere more so than in sub-Saharan Africa, which in 2009 accounted for 68 percent of cases worldwide and 69 percent of new infections. The IOM recommends that the United States and African nations move toward a strategy of shared responsibility such that these nations are empowered to take ownership of their HIV/AIDS problem and work to solve it.
  • Released: October 04, 2010
    Rare diseases collectively affect millions of Americans of all ages, but developing drugs and medical devices to prevent, diagnose, and treat these conditions is challenging. The IOM recommends implementing an integrated national strategy to promote rare diseases research and product development.